Source

Source for:   (Margaret) Elizabeth Cobham,   1304 - 2 AUG 1385         Index

Name source:    Details: Luczak Family Tree 2015-06-11 Citation Text: Record for (Mar
garet) Elizabeth Cobham

Birth source:    S519
Page:   Database online.

Birth source:    Details: Luczak Family Tree 2015-06-11 Citation Text: Record for (Mar
garet) Elizabeth Cobham

Death source:    Details: Luczak Family Tree 2015-06-11 Citation Text: Record for (Mar
garet) Elizabeth Cobham

Death source:    S519
Page:   Database online.

Name source:    S519
Page:   Database online.

Page:   Database online.

Name source:    Details: Luczak Family Tree 2015-06-11 Citation Text: Record for (Mar
garet) Elizabeth Cobham



Source

Source for:   Eleanor Peverel,   1380 - 1440         Index

Name source:    S519
Page:   Database online.

Birth source:    S519
Page:   Database online.

Death source:    S519
Page:   Database online.

Name source:    S519
Page:   Database online.



Source

Source for:   Thomas Courtenay,   1318 - 21 AUG 1347         Index

Name source:    S519
Page:   Database online.

Birth source:    S519
Page:   Database online.

Death source:    S519
Page:   Database online.

Birth source:    S519
Page:   Database online.

Name source:    S519
Page:   Database online.



Source

Source for:   Muriel de Moels,   1322 - 1363         Index

Name source:    S519
Page:   Database online.

Birth source:    S519
Page:   Database online.

Death source:    S519
Page:   Database online.

Name source:    S519
Page:   Database online.



Source

Source for:   Hugh Courtenay,   14 SEP 1273 - 23 DEC 1340         Index

Name source:    S519
Page:   Database online.

Birth source:    S519
Page:   Database online.

Death source:    S519
Page:   Database online.

Name source:    S190
Page:   Earl of Devon

Text:   Close kinsmen and powerful allies of the Plantagenet kings, especially Edward III, Richard II, Henry IV and Henry V, the Earls of Devon were treated with suspicion by the Tudors, perhaps unfairly, partly because William Courtenay, 1st Earl of Devon (1475–1511), had married Princess Catherine of York, a younger daughter of King Edward IV, bringing the Earls of Devon very close to the line of succession to the English throne. During the Tudor period all but the last Earl were attainted, and there were several recreations and restorations. The last recreation was to the heirs male of the grantee, not (as would be usual) to the heirs male of his body. When he died unmarried, it was assumed the title was extinct, but a much later very distant Courtenay cousin, of the family seated at Powderham, whose common ancestor was Hugh de Courtenay, 2nd Earl of Devon (d.1377), seven generations before this Earl, successfully claimed the title in 1831. During this period of dormancy the de jure Earls of Devon, the Courtenays of Powderham, were created baronets and later viscounts.

Her lands were inherited by her second cousin once removed, Hugh de Courtenay (1276–1340),[17] feudal baron of Okehampton, the great-grandson of Mary de Redvers and Robert de Courtenay (d.1242) of Okehampton. He was summoned by writ to Parliament in 1299 as Hugo de Curtenay,[18] whereby he is held to have become Baron Courtenay.[19] However, forty-one years after the death of Isabel de Forz, letters patent were issued on 22 February 1335 declaring him Earl of Devon, and stating that he 'should assume such title and style as his ancestors, Earls of Devon, had wont to do', by which he was confirmed as Earl of Devon.[20] Although some sources consider this a new grant the wording of the grant arguably indicates a confirmation and that he became thereby 9th Earl. Historic sources thus variously refer to him as either 1st Earl or 9th Earl, and the position cannot be decided either way due to the uncertainty of the surviving evidence. For the last years of his life he thus held two titles, 1st/9th Earl of Devon, by reason of the 1335 letters patent, and 1st Baron Courtenay, the title by which he had been summoned to Parliament in the years prior to the 1335 letters patent.[21] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earl_of_Devon
Page:   Earl of Devon

Text:   Close kinsmen and powerful allies of the Plantagenet kings, especially Edward III, Richard II, Henry IV and Henry V, the Earls of Devon were treated with suspicion by the Tudors, perhaps unfairly, partly because William Courtenay, 1st Earl of Devon (1475–1511), had married Princess Catherine of York, a younger daughter of King Edward IV, bringing the Earls of Devon very close to the line of succession to the English throne. During the Tudor period all but the last Earl were attainted, and there were several recreations and restorations. The last recreation was to the heirs male of the grantee, not (as would be usual) to the heirs male of his body. When he died unmarried, it was assumed the title was extinct, but a much later very distant Courtenay cousin, of the family seated at Powderham, whose common ancestor was Hugh de Courtenay, 2nd Earl of Devon (d.1377), seven generations before this Earl, successfully claimed the title in 1831. During this period of dormancy the de jure Earls of Devon, the Courtenays of Powderham, were created baronets and later viscounts.

Her lands were inherited by her second cousin once removed, Hugh de Courtenay (1276–1340),[17] feudal baron of Okehampton, the great-grandson of Mary de Redvers and Robert de Courtenay (d.1242) of Okehampton. He was summoned by writ to Parliament in 1299 as Hugo de Curtenay,[18] whereby he is held to have become Baron Courtenay.[19] However, forty-one years after the death of Isabel de Forz, letters patent were issued on 22 February 1335 declaring him Earl of Devon, and stating that he 'should assume such title and style as his ancestors, Earls of Devon, had wont to do', by which he was confirmed as Earl of Devon.[20] Although some sources consider this a new grant the wording of the grant arguably indicates a confirmation and that he became thereby 9th Earl. Historic sources thus variously refer to him as either 1st Earl or 9th Earl, and the position cannot be decided either way due to the uncertainty of the surviving evidence. For the last years of his life he thus held two titles, 1st/9th Earl of Devon, by reason of the 1335 letters patent, and 1st Baron Courtenay, the title by which he had been summoned to Parliament in the years prior to the 1335 letters patent.[21] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earl_of_Devon

Name source:    S519
Page:   Database online.