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Source for:   Harlevin (Herluin) de Conteville,   03 SEP 1001 - 1066         Index

Name source:    S137
Page:   Database online.

Text:   Record for Harlevin (Herluin) de Conteville

Birth source:    S137
Page:   Database online.

Text:   Record for Muriel De Conteville
Page:   Database online.

Text:   Record for Harlevin (Herluin) de Conteville

Death source:    S137
Page:   Database online.

Text:   Record for Muriel De Conteville
Page:   Database online.

Text:   Record for Harlevin (Herluin) de Conteville

Name source:    S190
Page:   Herluin de Conteville (1001–1066[1]), also sometimes listed as
Herlevin[citation needed] or Herlwin of Conteville,[2] was the stepfather of William the Conqueror, and the father of Odo of Bayeux and Robert, Count of Mortain, both of whom became prominent during William's reign.[3] 2013-02-03
Text:   Herluin de Conteville
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Herluin de Conteville (1001–1066[1]), also sometimes listed as Herlevin[citation needed] or Herlwin of Conteville,[2] was the stepfather of William the Conqueror, and the father of Odo of Bayeux and Robert, Count of Mortain, both of whom became prominent during William's reign.[3]

Conteville and Sainte-Marie Église

No contemporary record provides the parentage for Herluin,[4] although much later sources have assigned him parents (such as the otherwise unknown Jean de Conteville (965) and Harlette de Meulan[citation needed]). Herluin was a lord of moderate income and some land on the south side of the river Seine. He was viscount of Conteville, probably so created by his stepson, and held the honour of Sainte-Marie Église, a portion of the county of Mortain. There he founded the Grestain Abbey around 1050 with his son Robert.[5]

Herluin's marriage to Herleva

Towards the beginning of the 11th century, Conteville and its dependencies appear to be in the hands of Herluin, who married Herleva, the mistress of Robert I, Duke of Normandy and already mother of William the Bastard, called William the Conqueror later. Herluin and Herleva had two sons and one daughter: Odo or Eudes, who became Bishop of Bayeux, and Robert who became Count of Mortain; both were prominent in the reign of their half-brother William. The daughter, sometimes called Muriel, married Guillaume, Seigneur de la Ferté-Macé.[1] Herluin is said to have loyally borne William's body to his grave at Caen after he died in the burning of Mantes.[6]

Herluin's marriage to Fredesendis

Herluin later married Fredesendis, who is named as a benefactor[7] of the Grestain Abbey, and as Herluin's wife[1] in the confirmation charter of the abbey, dated 1189. The abbey was founded by Herluin himself around 1050,[7] in hopes of achieving a cure to his leprosy or some similar disease.[citation needed] Herluin and Fredesendis had two sons: Raoul de Conteville (d. aft. 1089), who later held land in Somerset and Devon,[1] and Jean de Conteville (who appears to have died young). Little is known of the sons of his second marriage.[4]
References

Normandy portal
^ a b c d "Norman Nobility". Medieval Lands Project. Retrieved 2007-12-23.
^ Freeman, Edward A. (1902). William the Conqueror. New York: The Perkins Book Company. p. 277
^ Freeman 1902, p. 15.
^ a b Hollister, C. Warren (1987). "The Greater Domesday Tenants-in-Chief". Domesday Studies; Novocentenary Conference: Papers. Boydell & Brewer. p. 235. ISBN 0-85115-477-8.
^ Freeman 1902, p. 112 and 382
^ Freeman, Edward A., William the Conqueror (1902), p. 276-277
^ a b David C. Douglas, William the Conqueror (1964), p. 382
Bates, David (1973) "Notes sur l'aristocratie normande: Hugues, évêque de Bayeux (1011 env. - 1049) et Herluin de Conteville et sa famille." Annales de Normandie 23 (1973): 7-38.

Name source:    S137
Page:   Database online.

Text:   Record for Muriel De Conteville


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Source for:   Odo of Bayeux,   BET 1021 AND 1046 - 1097         Index

Name source:    S190
Page:   Odo, Earl of Kent (early 1030s – 1097) and Bishop of Bayeux, was the
half-brother of William the Conqueror, and was, for a time, second in power after the King of England.[1] 2013-02-03
Text:   Odo, Earl of Kent
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Odo, club in hand, rallies Duke William's troops during the Battle of Hastings, as shown on the Bayeux Tapestry
Odo, Earl of Kent (early 1030s – 1097) and Bishop of Bayeux, was the half-brother of William the Conqueror, and was, for a time, second in power after the King of England.[1]

Early life

He was the son of William the Conqueror's mother Herleva, and Herluin de Conteville. Count Robert of Mortain was his younger brother. There is some uncertainty about his birth date. Some historians have suggested he was born as early as 1030, so that he would be about nineteen instead of fourteen when William made him Bishop of Bayeux in 1049.

Norman Conquest and after

Although he was an ordained Christian cleric, he is best known as a warrior and statesman. He found ships for the invasion of England and is one of the very few proven Companions of William the Conqueror known to have fought at the Battle of Hastings in 1066. The Bayeux Tapestry, probably commissioned by him to adorn his own cathedral, appears to labour the point that he did not actually fight, that is to say shed blood, at Hastings, but rather encouraged the troops from the rear. The Latin annotation embroidered onto the Tapestry above his image reads: "Hic Odo Eps (Episcopus) Baculu(m) Tenens Confortat Pueros", in English "Here Odo the Bishop holding a club strengthens the boys". It seems that his clerical status forbade him from using a sword,[2], though this is extremly suspect and the club was a common weapon and used often by leadership.[3]. He was accompanied by William the carrier of his crozier and a retinue of servants and members of his household.

In 1067, Odo became Earl of Kent, and for some years he was a trusted royal minister. On some occasions when William was absent (back in Normandy), he served as de facto regent of England, and at times he led the royal forces against rebellions (e.g. the Revolt of the Earls): the precise sphere of his powers is not certain, however. There are also other occasions when he accompanied William back to Normandy.

During this time Odo acquired vast estates in England, larger in extent than any one except the king: he had land in twenty-three counties, primarily in the south east and in East Anglia.

Trial, imprisonment and rebellion

In 1076 Odo was tried in front of a large and senior assembly over the course of three days at Penenden Heath in Kent for defrauding the Crown and the Diocese of Canterbury. At the conclusion of the trial he was forced to return a number of properties and his assets were re-apportioned.[4]

In 1082, he was suddenly disgraced and imprisoned for having planned a military expedition to Italy. His motivations are not certain. Chroniclers writing a generation later said Odo desired to make himself Pope, but the contemporary evidence is ambiguous.[citation needed] Whatever the reason, Odo spent the next five years in prison, and his English estates were taken back by the king, as was his office as Earl of Kent: Odo was not however deposed as Bishop of Bayeux.

William, on his deathbed in 1087, was reluctantly persuaded by his brother, Robert, Count of Mortain, to release Odo. After the king's death, Odo returned to his earldom and soon organized a rebellion in support of William's son, Robert Curthose, who had been made Duke of Normandy.[5]:433-436 The Rebellion of 1088 failed and William Rufus permitted Odo to leave the kingdom. Afterwards, Odo remained in the service of Robert in Normandy.[5]:450-452

He joined the First Crusade, and started in the duke's company for Palestine, but died on the way at Palermo in January or February 1097.

Character and achievements

Little good is recorded of Odo, and it was recorded that his vast wealth was gained by extortion and robbery. His ambitions were boundless and his morals lax[citation needed]; however, like many prelates of his age, he was a patron of learning and the arts. He was also a great architect. He founded the Abbaye de Troarn in 1059 and rebuilt the cathedral of his see, and is likely to have commissioned the celebrated Bayeux Tapestry. He may also have sponsored an early version of The Song of Roland. More certain is his development of the cathedral school in Bayeux, and his patronage of a number of younger men who later became prominent prelates.

Commentary on Odo

William Stearns Davis writes in Life on a Medieval Barony:

Bishop Odo of Bayeux fought at Hastings (1066) before any such authorized champions of the church existed. ...That bishops shall restrain from warfare is really a pious wish not easily in this sinful world to be granted.[6]

Portrayals on screen

On screen, Odo has been portrayed by John Nettleton in the two-part BBC TV play Conquest (1966), part of the series Theatre 625, and by Denis Lill in the TV drama Blood Royal: William the Conqueror (1990).

Notes

^ Bates 2004.
^ This reason for his use of a club was proposed by David C. Douglas & George W. Greenaway, (Eds.) in: English Historical Documents 1042-1189, London, 1959, p.238, The Bayeux Tapestry. However, as Duke William himself is shown further on also holding a club, the theory seems to lose force
^ Ewart Oakeshott is of the opinion and thinks the club has signifigance as a symbol of leadership in "European Weapons and Armour" Ewart Oakeshott, 1980 P62-63
^ Ireland 1829, p. 653.
^ a b Ordericus Vitalis; Guizot (François, M.), Léopold Delisle (1854). The ecclesiastical history of England and Normandy, Volume 2. H.G. Bohn. Retrieved 16 July 2011.
^ William Stearns Davis, Life on a Medieval Barony p. 382.

References

Bates, David (September 2004). "Odo, earl of Kent (d. 1097)". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/20543. Retrieved 23 August 2010
Ireland, William Henry (1829). England's Topographer: or A New and Complete History of the County of Kent. London: G. Virtue.
Attribution
This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press.

Further reading

Normandy portal
LePatourel, John (September 1946). "The Date of the Trial on Penenden Heath". The English Historical Review 61 (241): 378–388. doi:10.1093/ehr/LXI.CCXLI.378.
"Odo of Bayeux (Norman noble)". Britannica Online Encyclopedia. Encyclopædia Britannica. Retrieved 2010-08-12.
David Bates, 'The Character and Career of Odo, Bishop of Bayeux (1049/50–1097)', in: Speculum, vol. 50, pp. 1–20 (1975).